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The Marketing Elements of a Video

Today, video marketing is one of the most powerful strategies to promote a product online. According to a digital marketing speaker (HK), companies using video marketing have 44% more traffic than those who don’t use videos. Videos share on social media get 1200% more likes and shares than images and text. Emails with videos received 200% to 300% click-through rates than non-video emails. On the other hand, videos in landing pages boost website conversion rates by 80%. So, if you have not yet embraced video marketing, it is high time to adopt such a strategy to boost awareness and sales. Below are the marketing elements of a video to further guide you.

ELEMENT NO. 1 – THE HOOK

Every brand needs to catch the audience’s interest in the first 5 seconds of a video ad. That is why brands need to use a hook to boost their interest. A hook is something interesting that plays at the start of a video to draw the viewers’ interest. Yet in reality, there are two ways for brands to use a hook. First, at the start of a video (first 5 seconds). Second, to use a hook throughout a video to remind viewers that there is more to come. Here are some ideas on how you can create a hook:

  • Animation is a fun element and for easier understanding. 
  • Brand messaging in bold graphics.
  • Introducing a problem and promising a solution.
  • Offering a surprise through blurred images, exaggerated statements or upside-down elements, etc.
  • Promising a “once-upon-a-time” story.
  • Telling potential clients about your expertise or what you do.
  • Text memes or quotes to inspire your viewers. 

ELEMENT NO. 2 – THE VIDEO INTRODUCTION

Another important element of a video is an introduction. The video introduction is a summary of the video content. It should be done in a straightforward tone and as quick as 30 seconds. Typically, brands use the following video introductions:

  • Announcement about the presenter and his or her credentials
  • Brand or company snapshot 
  • Business case description
  • Event preview
  • Project proposal

The video introduction is a brand’s chance to make a good first impression. Today, there are more dynamic ways to liven up a video introduction. These include:

  • A timeless short clip that evokes emotion.
  • Creative AR introduction.
  • Self-introduction of a speaker.
  • Stomp sound effects introducing the video context.
  • Teaser of the outcome in full HD graphics.
  • Text placeholders highlighting a brand message in bold characters.
  • The glitch effect engages viewers out of the gate.

The video introduction should always be translated into text. This is by filling up the meta description of the video during the uploading process.

ELEMENT NO. 3 – THE CONTENT DELIVERY

The content delivery element of a video should be the most creative and informative part. Why? Because it is the section of the video that will make viewers aware of the benefits of a product or the importance of a brand. Every video needs to be planned. Everything planned should complement each section – from the hook, introduction, content, bonus, offer, and CTA. Above all, the content delivery should be a brand’s value, a promised story, or a solution to a problem, 

ELEMENT NO. 4 – THE BONUS OR OFFER

Bonuses on a video are elements that help viewers go to the next step of their viewing journey. It may either be a BOGO promotion, discounted offer, or trade exchange. The purpose of these bonuses or offers on a video is to encourage viewers to make a purchase. Other ways to add a bonus or offer element in a video are an action plan, added tips, or template. These things give them a wow factor to remember the brand.

ELEMENT NO. 5 – THE BONUS OR OFFER

A call to action (CTA) is a link to take immediate action or response from the viewers of a video. This video element should be less than 20 seconds. Only one CTA must be added per video to avoid confusion among the viewers and to boost action over the CTA. According to a video marketing agency (HK), the three basic types of CTA are:

  • Small CTAs asking for likes, comments, shares, and subscriptions
  • Bigger CTA asking for email opt-in and lead magnets
  • Huge CTA asking for conversion or sales

THE BOTTOM LINE

If you’re starting to use video as a marketing strategy, keep in mind to grow your audience and followers. This you can do by creating a video with a hook, introduction, content delivery, bonus or offer, and call to action. Once you’ve got 1000 followers or subscribers, you can use small CTAs. If you’ve got around 2000 fans, you can use bigger CTAs. Likewise, a social media agency (HK) recommends using huge CTAs if you’ve got a great following on the videos of your social media accounts. Today, YouTube, Facebook, and Instagram are the top social media platforms for video marketing.

Reference: https://www.green-umbrella.biz/five-key-elements-creating-video/

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The Power of UGC in Video Marketing

Are you a fan of GoPro, the world’s most versatile camera? In November 2015, the company launched the “GoPro of the World Challenge.” Fabio Wibmer, an Australian trail biker, won $1000 on the challenge for capturing the craziest bike ride. Today, Wibmer’s video has 33 million views on YouTube. GoPro continues to solicit user-generated content (UGC) generating 6,000 videos daily. The brand also has a separate webpage that guides users on how to create and upload content to make it on the page of fame. By thinking outside the box and creating a UGC culture, GoPro is a game-changer in video marketing.

What are UGCs?

UGC stands for user-generated content. They are images, posts, reviews, text, or videos created by people, not brands. Typically, these types of content are published on social media platforms. According to a digital marketing speaker (HK), UGCs have been the most compelling form of content. They are 3X more authentic than branded content. They are 35% more memorable than other media. They also influenced the buying decision by 79%. UGCs present unprecedented opportunities for brands to market with people. Among the most famous examples of UGCs today are:

  • Blogs on product reviews
  • Case studies or interviews of customers
  • Customer ratings, reviews, and testimonials
  • Recommendation from forums, groups, or tweets
  • Social media images and videos

UGCs are types of video marketing (HK) that no longer need costly photoshoots and high-tech cameras. As such, brands can save money, resources, and time to focus on more important priorities.

The Power of UGC on Video Marketing

Below is some powerful user-generated content that a brand can use to achieve a specific video marketing goal.

  • Contests and promotions are a great way to boost brand engagement. Just like GoPro, generating videos from customers daily sparks conversation and reactions. Today, short-form video content is a favorite of the top social media agency (HK). UGCs in short-form video content may be a live stream, product demos, testimonials, or a vlog (video blog). Brands may run a contest of UGC videos garnering the most likes and shares.  They can also offer freebies among customers who share unique video content promoting a brand.

In 2013, Coca-Cola kicked off the “Ahh Effect.” It called for teenage customers to record a 2-minute video showing what does it feel like when you take a sip of Coke. The result of such a UGC video campaign was phenomenal. Around 5 million consumers visited Coca-Cola’s website. Coke has generated 5x more exposure than their traditional ads shown on TV.

  • Reviews and testimonials promote trust and loyalty among brands. Every buyer wants to see social proof about a product or service. Recently Google launched a video and review platform called Shoploop. It features live videos of product demos and reviews from its customer base. 

Closet Works, Inc. is a leading manufacturer of storage solutions in the United States. Its website houses a video library showing an intercut of customer testimonials with their storage solution results. From its humble beginnings in the 1990s, Closet Works, Inc grew to 40 authorized dealers in 13 states.

  • Unboxing videos from customers, especially influencers, can educate customers about a product or service. Nothing is more exciting than opening a special product that has recently been launched in the market. It’s a great video marketing strategy for new gadgets, games, toys, or tech products. These products are not just everyday purchases. They are special because they are either the latest craze or trends. 

In August 2016, Ryan Kaji, the world’s top YouTube earner from 2018 to 2020, published an unboxing video of a Furby Connect toy on his YouTube channel. Since then, this UGC video has earned more than 8.5 million views. Furby Connect, an electronic robot toy, also became Hasbro’s best-selling toy during that year.

Best Practices in Using UGCs to Video Marketing

UGC in video marketing is indeed powerful. It is a form of word-of-mouth advertising. Happy customers are the most budget-friendly and effective way to boost connection and engagement. Yet, there are three best practices that brands should never forget to gain success when using UGC for video marketing.

  • Know where to share. Brands need to carefully identify where to share the perfect UGC video. They should know where the audience is. Even though marketing means reaching out far and wide, there are times when you need to capture the right audience to thrive. Facebook is a perfect platform for sharing videos of customers engaging in a brand. Instagram is a place for high-impact visuals. So, brands must share well-crafted stories. Tweet a dynamic customer quote with the UGC video link to target retweets. Reflect your brand’s value when sharing user testimonials on LinkedIn.
  • Motivate your followers to share. The best way to have a steady flow of UGCs in video marketing is to motivate customers and followers to share. Incentivize people through fun giveaways. Contests and promotions make way for showcasing high-resolution and curated videos. They are perfect marketing tools. Keep a content library of all UGCs, and carefully plan the right time when to share each. Never forget to thank the owners of the video. Treat them well because they are an extension of the brand’s marketing team.
  • Ask the owner’s permission to share their videos and don’t forget to credit them when posting. Social media platforms make it easier for brands to share content. But it will be good if brands practice respect. This can add up to a good reputation. Always ask permission from the owner of the video to share their content. A simple comment on the post or a direct message in their inbox will do. Send a brief and friendly message noting where you plan to share their content. Once the owner grants you permission, compliment and thank them using mentions or tags.

Reference: https://embedsocial.com/blog/user-generated-content/